Radiometric dating activity high school

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Using the absolute dating principles provided in Phase 1 of the lesson, students will make decisions of which artifacts to send to a lab for absolute dating.Based on this information, they will learn how to relatively date associated artifacts.The second lesson, Radioactive Decay: A Sweet Simulation of Half-life, introduces the idea of half-life.By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that all matter is made up of atoms, which are far too small to see directly through a microscope.

This time varies from few-millionths of a second to millions of years for different radioactive isotopes.

For example, in a given sample of rock, after 713 million years, half of the originally-present uranium-235 will be changed to lead: this is the "half-life" of uranium-235. Origin and Evolution of Earth System: Geologic time can be estimated by observing rock sequences at various locations.

After another 713 million years, half of what was left will have decayed, etc. Current methods include using the known decay rates of radioactive isotopes present in rocks to measure the time since the rock was formed.

By measuring the ratio of uranium-235 to lead, scientists can calculate the age of the rock.

Strand 1: Inquiry Process Concept 2, PO 5: Record observations, notes, sketches, questions, and ideas using tools such as journals, charts, graphs, and computers.

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